WordTeasers

Turn Dinner time into Conversation Time “WordTeasers®”

It’s a conversation dilemma that almost every parent has faced: How was school today? Fine. What did you do? Nothing. Getting more than a “yes,” “no,” or “fine” from a teenager at dinnertime can often be a challenge. But now there’s a solution. It’s called WordTeasers—a series of clever, table-top word games that get parents and their kids talking, laughing, and thinking—and learning something new at the same time.

For example, there’s WordTeasers: Funny Sayings—an amusing word game that challenges kids, their friends, and parents to answer funny or thought-provoking questions using well-known idioms (expressions whose meaning can’t be determined by the words themselves). Questions or commands—like, “Tell about something you do once in a blue moon”; “Who among your friends loves being in the limelight”; “Tell about a time you had egg on your face”—are designed not only to help upper elementary grade students learn these idiomatic expressions, but also to help fire up great conversations among kids and their bffs, their parents, their grandparents or just about anybody else who likes to laugh out loud.

The idea for this game came about one raining Saturday when Susan Flora, president and co-founder of the new educational game company, mentioned to her then 9-year-old that it was “raining cats and dogs.” Her son laughed, but then asked, “Did you just make that up?” Flora and her business partner realized that young kids simply didn’t know these strange expressions. “We decided there had to be a fun way to help kids learn these idioms while at the same time getting kids and their parents engaged in thoughtful conversations,” Flora said. Each WordTeasers: Funny Sayings Challenge Card includes a challenging question or statement on the front of the card, such as, “When was the last time you had to eat humble pie.” The back of the card includes the meaning of the idiomatic expression, as well as its often fascinating origin. For example, who would have guessed that “eat humble pie” came from the 15th century word umbles, which referred to the heart, liver, and other parts of animals? “Umbles were often used as ingredients for ‘pot pies,’” says Flora. “But this type of pie wasn’t the best food to serve to guests and so was often served with an apology. I’m sorry, sire, I only have umble pie to serve you.”

 

The game comes with numerous suggestions for play. Number of players? “The more the merrier,” says Flora. “Simply put the colorful and compact WordTeasers box on the dinner table or kitchen counter and draw out a few cards each night. You’ll be surprised how quickly the cards generate a lively discussion on a whole variety of topics.” Other products in the WordTeasers line include WordTeasers: SAT Vocabulary (for high school students studying for the SAT or ACT), WordTeasers: Junior (conversation starters with words students should know by the end of the 6th grade), WordTeasers: World Geography (a game of fascinating and little-known facts about countries and cultures around the world), and WordTeasers: American Heroes & Legends (a deck of conversation starters based on quotes from famous Americans). Each game comes in a colorful box that is compact and easily portable for family!

 

WordTeasers are now available at Family Fun Hobbies! We even have a few boxes open for you to try out!

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